Animal Hospital

Serving Bel Air, Aberdeen & Surrounding Areas

The Hospital

Chadwell Animal Hospital opened its doors in September 2003. It was a collaborative effort by Dr. Keith Gold and Dr. Ruby Schaupp (a husband and wife team).
Chadwell Animal Hospital

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3004 Emmorton Road
Abingdon, MD 21009
443-512-8338



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Pet Owner Info Library

We have tons of good information for pet owners

The General Husbandry of Caged Birds

The General Husbandry of Caged Birds

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Sep 2, 2014

Birds provide a rewarding relationship for many owners today, but keeping this relationship a long and happy one can be more challenging than many people anticipate. There are some elemental facts, which this paper will discuss that should better the chances of your bird reaching a healthy old age. To begin with, choose the species that is best suited to your lifestyle. All too often, an owner will be surprised by the time demanded by a social bird such as an umbrella cockatoo and be forced to find the bird a new home. This is upsetting for bird and owner alike. A better choice for the busy person may be something along the lines of a finch or canary. Your veterinarian will be able to guide you in ways to make the right decision. Providing the proper housing and environment for your bird follows some fundamental rules, but, as with every aspect of bird care, will be a learning experience for the owner. The cage should be large enough for the species you have selected. It should be large enough for the species you have selected. It should be near a source of direct sunlight (not shielded by glass), or at least in proximity to a UV light. Perches should be of varying diameters, very clean, and never covered with sandpaper. Toys provided should be safe (non-ingestible and non-toxic), and should be removed before a trip to the vet’s. Paper toweling is best for the cage bottom. Do not clean the cage bottom or transport carrier before a vet examines your bird; their droppings can tell the doctor a...

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Signs of Illness in Birds

Signs of Illness in Birds

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Sep 2, 2014

Early signs of illness in birds are frequently missed by the average pet owner. In the wild, a sick bird will attempt to maintain a normal appearance as long as possible. One result of this behavior in companion birds is that by the time signs of illness are obvious, the bird may have been ill for some time. The bird that dies “suddenly” may be a result of failure of the caretaker to identify changes in the appearance or behavior of the bird. For this reason, owners should famiiliarize themselves with early signs of illness in pet birds so that any therapy and care by their avian veterinarian will have a more favorable outcome. EVALUATION OF DROPPINGS Droppings can be an indicator of your bird’s health. Paper towels, newspaper or other smooth surfaces can be used to line the cage bottom so that the number, volume, color, and consistency of the droppings can be noted. A bird’s normal droppings will vary in appearance depending on its diet. Normal Droppings Feces (food waste material from the digestive tract) can differ somewhat in color and consistency. Diets with a high seed content usually produce homogeneous black or dark green feces. Birds on formulated diets normally exhibit soft, brownish feces. Urine is normally a clear liquid. A diet high in vegetable and fruit matter may increase the urine component. Urates (creamy white waste from the kidney) are often suspended in the liquid urine or appear to wrap around the feces. POSTMORTEM EXAMINATION If a bird is found dead, the body should be thoroughly soaked in soapy water, placed in a plastic bag,...

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What All Owners Should Know About Poisonous Plants

What All Owners Should Know About Poisonous Plants

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Sep 1, 2014

This is a partial list of poisonous indoor and outdoor plants that may be lurking in your home or yard and harmful to your pooch. As pretty as they may be, you should be on the alert! One of the first things a dog owner should look at is just how high of a risk these plants are to your dog. Consider your dog’s age. Is he a puppy or full grown adult? Many if not most puppies make their way through the world by exploring and investigating everything orally. In other words, they love to chew, chew, chew. Most puppies grow out of this stage as they mature and stop teething. When they are outside, watch carefully to see if they are drawn to sticks, flowers or tree leaves. Another risk factor is your dog’s penchant for plant chewing. Some dogs are just naturally drawn to plant leaves and flowers, regardless of their age, while others virtually ignore them. You know your dog best-you are the best judge of potential chewing problems. Many toxic plants rarely pose a threat because the majority of dogs don’t chew on them, even if they are commonly found in their environment. So the age and tendencies of your dog play a great role in their safety. Keep in mind also that dogs will have varying reactions to different plants, trees and shrubs. Some will cause only a mild rash or itchiness, while contact with others result in more severe irritations such as facial and throat pain and swelling. This can turn fatal if the airway becomes blocked. Still other plants (though not...

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