Animal Hospital

Serving Bel Air, Aberdeen & Surrounding Areas

The Hospital

Chadwell Animal Hospital opened its doors in September 2003. It was a collaborative effort by Dr. Keith Gold and Dr. Ruby Schaupp (a husband and wife team).
Chadwell Animal Hospital

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3004 Emmorton Road
Abingdon, MD 21009
443-512-8338



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Australian Bearded Dragon

Australian Bearded Dragon

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Sep 2, 2014

The Australian Bearded Dragon is one of the best lizards to own as a pet. They develop a very docile nature when handled gently and frequently, are usually very good eaters, and are social animals, which often display amusing behaviors. Many kinds of bearded dragons are available today, the most common being the inland variety, which comes in red or golden phases.  In the wild, they can be found in the arid, rocky outback or in the dry woodlands of Australia,  Here, they spend much of their time climbing, basking in the sun, and eating just about anything they outsize If threatened, a dragon will flatten out its usually chubby body, flare its throat (darker in males, thus “bearded”), and display a gaping mouth.  This behavior is rarely seen in captivity.  The more passive “hand-waving” displayed by more subordinate dragons to dominate ones is much more likely to be witnessed. Although these lizards are social, males are territorial.  If you choose to house them together, house only lizards of similar size together.  Otherwise,  the smaller may provide a tasty snack for the larger.  Females usually establish a hierarchy nicely on their own, but a 50-gallon tank may not even be large enough to prevent a dominant male from stressing or biting its subordinates. Proper housing for a bearded dragon should include several things.  The well-ventilated enclosure should be big enough so that a wide temperature gradient is achieved both horizontally and vertically.  During the day, this gradient should be 86-76 F, with a basking area of 90-100 F near the top of the cage.  At night, the cool areas...

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Argentine Horned Frog Care Sheet

Argentine Horned Frog Care Sheet

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Sep 2, 2014

Scientific Name:  Ceratophrys ornate Common Name:  Argentine Horned Frog (AKA Pacman Frog) Where are they found?   South America from Brazil to Argentina Natural Habitat:  Shallow water. Spend a lot of time buried underground during the fall and winter months of the year when the temperatures are cooler. Description:  Females are much larger than males. Males have nuptial pads on thumbs or inside of hands. (Can’t be sexed until they are nearly adults).  Males also usually have a darker colored throat than the females. These frogs have big eyes that stick up from body (hence the name “horned” frog). Big, fat, round, colorful frog with a huge mouth which when open, is almost as big as the whole animal. They are available in normal and albino phase. Vocalization:  When threatened, they can make a screaming sound. Size:  Approximately 8 inches in diameter for an adult female. Color:  Yellow or light green with black edged green spots. Yellowish-white belly. Albinos are orange, yellow and white. Diet in the wild:  Anything alive that will fit into their mouth! They eat everything in one bite. Do they make good pets?  Yes. They are low maintenance and interesting pets, however they are not very active. Housing:  Large plastic aquarium or 10-20 gallon aquarium. They cannot jump very high, so they don’t need tall housing. Temperature:  They are tropical and need a warm environment. The air temperature should be 80° F. Humidity:  Keep substrate moist, but not wet. Can mist cage daily to add humidity. Furniture:  Water bowl large enough for soaking (change and disinfect weekly or if you notice feces in the water) and hide box. You...

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African Spurred Tortoise Care Sheet

African Spurred Tortoise Care Sheet

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Sep 2, 2014

Scientific Name:  Geochelone sulcata Common Name:  African Spurred Tortoise Where are they found?  Northern Africa: Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Niger, Chad, The Sudan, Ethiopia. Natural Habitat:  Hottest, driest regions of the desert. Description:  They are the largest African Tortoise. Broad, flat carapace. They have thick skin to hold water. Growth rings are obvious. Adult males have reverted marginal scales in the front. They have spurs (like claws) on the legs. Males are a little bigger as adults. Females have a slightly flatter carapace and males have slightly concave plastrons. Vocalization:  Hiss when frightened. Size:  24-31: (61-75cm), largest 41.6” Hatchlings are 11/2-2” and oval shaped. Weight:  Adults 80-160 lbs. Largest 232 lbs! Don’t let their size fool you, hatchlings weigh less than an ounce (20-25 gm). Life Expectancy:  Oldest spurred tortoise in captivity is 54 yrs. Color:  Brownish, gray or yellowish. Skin color matches shell. Tortoise color camouflages easily in the desert or savannah. Hatchlings are brown/yellow with brown borders on scutes. Diet in the wild:  Grasses and other plants. Predators/Enemies:  Humans, loss of habitat. Do they make good pets?  They are interesting and personable, but need a huge amount of space and food. Housing:  Because of their ability to dig, if you keep this tortoise outside you need to take extra precautions to keep the tortoise from escaping his enclosure. Keep the top covered if possible to keep predators away (especially important with smaller tortoises). Need a huge amount of space. Males can be very aggressive when housed together. Hatchlings can be kept in a large aquarium (40 gallon would be nice) with a substrate they can eat. Temperature:  Daytime 85-105ºF, Night 70 ºs F. Give a variety...

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