Animal Hospital

Serving Bel Air, Aberdeen & Surrounding Areas

The Hospital

Chadwell Animal Hospital opened its doors in September 2003. It was a collaborative effort by Dr. Keith Gold and Dr. Ruby Schaupp (a husband and wife team).
Chadwell Animal Hospital

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3004 Emmorton Road
Abingdon, MD 21009
443-512-8338



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Care of the Thai water dragon, Physignathus cocincinus

Care of the Thai water dragon, Physignathus cocincinus

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Sep 2, 2014

The Thai water dragon, Physignathus cocincinus, originates from the forests of India and eastern Asia, and often remains close to fresh water. This member of the family AgamidaeAgamids, lizards of the family Agamidae, include more than 300 species in Africa, Asia, Australia, and a few in Southern Europe. Many species are commonly called dragons or dragon lizards. may reach 90 centimeters in total length of which more than half is tail. Coloration varies from brown to bright green with males often the brightest during the breeding season. Captive bred specimens are far more preferable over wild caught imports. Water dragons require large spacious enclosures for the inclusion of climbing branches and a large bathing area. One to three animals can be kept in an enclosure of at least 2 meters high x 1.8 meters long and 1 meter deep. Exhibits can be constructed from fiberglass, plastic, or melamine-coated wood. Wooden materials must be treated or coated with non-toxic paints to prevent moisture damage and all internal edges sealed with using non-toxic sealants. Ventilation should never be reduced to maintain temperature and humidity, and 0.125 m2 ventilation area per cubic meter of enclosure is advised. One-way glass or dark tape on clear glass helps to improve barrier perception by lizards, and prevents snout abrasions. A large water container and sprinkler/water drip system are essential to maintain humidity at 60-90%. The floor should be covered with paper or outdoor carpeting that can be cleaned whenever soiled. If bark chips or other particulate material is used, remove soiled material immediately and change the entire substrate frequently. Hideouts or retreats must also be provided...

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Captive Care of the Desert Tortoise, Gopherus agassizii

Captive Care of the Desert Tortoise, Gopherus agassizii

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Sep 2, 2014

Client handout from the: Journal of HerpetolologicalHerpetology is the branch of zoology concerned with the study of amphibians and reptiles. Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 11, No.3, 2001 Housing Tortoises should be housed in outdoor enclosures whenever possible A backyard or enclosed are of the yard works well Make sure the enclosure is escape proof by digging a barrier structure deep into the ground along the perimeter of the enclosure or by placing a layer of sheet metal bent at a 90º angle inward under ground level The enclosure can be landscaped with nutritious vegetation Do not allow tortoises to inhabit the same yard with dogs, Dogs will often chew on tortoises. Burrows can be constructed in many ways. A 0.5-1.5 m (2-4 ft) deep burrow can be dug into the ground, the side of a sloping area of the enclosure, or built upward from ground level. The sides can be lined with brick for support. The top can be covered with wood or other materials and covered with plastic. The structure should be covered with enough soil, 30 cm (1 ft), to provide adequate insulation from the cold winter and hot summer temperatures. If indoor housing is used, aquariums or plastic tubs can be used. Use an overhead lamp to provide a heat source keeping the temperatures ranging from 25-32º C (78-90º F). A gradient should exist in the cage allowing the tortoise to select warmer or cooler temperatures, as it desires. An ultraviolet light source specifically indicated for reptiles should be placed directly over the cage. The cage should be allowed to cool at night to 20-24º C...

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Captive Care of the Boa Constrictor

Captive Care of the Boa Constrictor

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Sep 2, 2014

Client Handout from the Journal of Herpetological Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 11, No. 2, 2001 Husbandry Boas should be housed individually, except during breeding attempts. Enclosures for juvenile boas should be at least 61 cm (24 in) long an 38 to 61 cm (15 to 24 in) high. Adult boas should be housed in enclosures at least 1.8 m (6ft) long, 61 cm (24 in) wide, and at least 61 cm (24 in) high. Larger cages provide better opportunities for establishing a proper thermal gradient. Newspaper or butcher paper is the preferred substrate since it is inexpensive and easy to change when it becomes soiled. Each also has the added benefit of allowing direct visualization of the feces and urates. Artificial turf, mulches, and various wood shavings may also be used, but lack some of beneficial qualities of newspaper. Mulches and wood shavings may inadvertently be ingested while feeding. Dilute bleach water (1:30) is a useful disinfectant for cages and artificial turfs. All organic matter needs to be washed away prior to using the dilute bleach. The bleach solution should be left on for ten minutes before washing off. Providing the proper thermal gradient is critical to the well being of the snake. The preferred optimal temperature zone during the day is between 27-29ºC (80-85ºF), with a basking spot up to 35ºC (95ºF). Nighttime lows can be between 21-27ºC (70-80ºF). Thermostatically controlled fiberglass heat mats are an excellent way to provide the proper thermal environment. The mats are mounted ventrally and should be no longer than 25-30% of the suface area of the cage. Flexwatt® and plumbing heat tape...

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