Animal Hospital

Serving Bel Air, Aberdeen & Surrounding Areas

The Hospital

Chadwell Animal Hospital opened its doors in September 2003. It was a collaborative effort by Dr. Keith Gold and Dr. Ruby Schaupp (a husband and wife team).
Chadwell Animal Hospital

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3004 Emmorton Road
Abingdon, MD 21009
443-512-8338



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Pet Owner Info Library

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Care of Water Turtles

Care of Water Turtles

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Oct 8, 2014

Avian and Exotic Animal Hospitals of Los Angeles and Orange Counties Richard W. Woerpel, MS, DVM Walter J. Rosskopf, Jr, DVM Introduction Various species of water turtles are kept as pets in the United States. Most of those purchased by hobbyists originate from the southern and eastern regions of the U.S. By law, imported turtles of most species must be at least 4 inches long. The trade in exotic turtles has been increasing in recent years, especially in countries with poor animal protection laws and abundant turtle populations. Turtles inhabit all parts of the world with a temperate to warm climate and are especially abundant in the tropics and subtropics. Water turtles are found in a wide variety of habitats, including ponds, swamps, small pools thick with vegetation, lakes of all sizes, large streams and rivers. All water turtles share some obvious physical characteristics, such as a top and bottom shell and webbed feet. Many have developed specific adaptations to cope with specific environmental conditions. The Diamondback Terrapin, for example, is confined in its geographic distribution to the brackish water of the coastal eastern U.S. (brackish water has a salt content between that of fresh and sea water). The Malaysian Snail-Eating Turtle survives well in its environment on a diet of mainly snails. The Mata Mata is an unusual looking turtle that resembles the rotting vegetation found on the bottoms of the relatively shallow lakes and rivers in which it lives. It is a poor swimmer and rarely leaves its aquatic habitat, except to lay eggs. The Mata Mata rests motionless on the bottom, well camouflaged among the decomposing...

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Rabbit Care Information

Rabbit Care Information

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Sep 22, 2014

Diet   FRESH VEGETABLES: It is recommended that rabbits be fed plenty of fresh vegetables from the time that they start eating and throughout life. Feed vegetables daily. Here are a few suggestions: basil escarole mustard greens bok choy mint broccoli (including leaves) parsley brussel sprouts pea pods carrot & carrot tops peppermint leaves dill celery raddichio cilantro radish tops clover raspberry leaves collard greens red leaf lettuce romaine lettuce dandelion greens dandelion flowers watercress PELLETS: Rabbits should be fed fresh, good quality pellets.  If possible, purchase pellets from a feed store.  If you switch from one brand of feed to another, do it gradually to avoid upsetting the rabbit’s digestive system.  (Many pet supply stores keep food in their warehouses for many months prior to when it is placed on their shelves and often their food is already stale.) You should not purchase more than a 6 week supply of food at a time or it will become spoiled/rancid and can cause the rabbit to stop eating.  Call around until you find a feed store that will sell small quantities like 5 or 10 pounds or share purchases with a friend who has a rabbit. Recommended analysis: Protein: 16% – 18% for young rabbits.  Fiber: 18% minimum, the higher the better.   Do NOT purchase a feed that is medicated (popular with breeders) or supplemented with bits of dried fruit and seed–it is VERY high in sugar and fat. Pellets should be available 24 hours a day for rabbits under 6 months old.  After 6 months of age pellets should be reduced to 1/4 cup per 5 pounds of...

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All About the FERRET

All About the FERRET

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Sep 22, 2014

by Oxford Ferret Rescue What are Ferrets? Ferrets are domestic animals and cousins of weasels, skunks, and otters. They are not rodents! They are friendly and make excellent pets. If you’ve never met one before, the easiest way to think of them is somewhere between dogs and cats in personality, but much smaller. Ferrets do not have good eyesight, they make up for this with their great sense of hearing and smell. Each is unique in its personality and temperament. Some are cuddly, others more independent. Much depends on where they came from and how they were raised. Ferrets live an average of 6-8 years, and are considered senior citizens after age 3. What’s good about ferrets as pets? Ferrets are a lot of fun! They are very playful with each other and with you, even as they age. They can be very entertaining companions. They are also very inquisitive and remarkably determined, which is part of their charm but can also be a bit of a challenge. They are friendly and bond with their owners. Ferrets can be trained to use a litter box and do tricks. Most of them love to go places with you, riding on a shoulder, or in a bag. They sleep a lot and don’t particularly mind being in a cage, but they do need time to run around and play for at least a few hours each day. A single ferret won’t be terribly lonely as long as they get plenty of attention from their human companion, however, the fun of watching 2 or 3 playing together might be worth the little...

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