Animal Hospital

Serving Bel Air, Aberdeen & Surrounding Areas

The Hospital

Chadwell Animal Hospital opened its doors in September 2003. It was a collaborative effort by Dr. Keith Gold and Dr. Ruby Schaupp (a husband and wife team).
Chadwell Animal Hospital

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3004 Emmorton Road
Abingdon, MD 21009
443-512-8338



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Green Iguana

Green Iguana

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Oct 8, 2014

The common or green iguana has been gaining popularity as an exotic pet for several years.  Unfortunately, misinformation and naivete about the true needs of this species have led to many sick animals and disappointed owners.  This paper will discuss the latest, and most reliable ways to raise a happy, healthy iguana. Green iguanas are striking creatures, found in the wild from northern Mexico to central South America.  This species of lizard is arboreal and diurnal, and enjoys being in close proximity to streams and rivers (they are excellent swimmers).  If nutrition is appropriate, iguanas can reach an impressive 6 and ½ feet within 3-5 years of hatching.  Dewlaps hanging from the throats of iguanas help them to regulate their body temperature.  The crest of soft spines on the neck and back, and the femoral pores on the underside of the rear legs are more prominent in males.  When young, iguanas are a bright green color, which softens to earthy tones or a beautiful bluish-green hue when mature.  They have strong jaws, a long tail and sharp claws, all used for defense if threatened.  The claws of captive iguanas should be filed ( not cut ) regularly, for the safety of the owner.  Iguanas are sexually mature at 2 years of age and their normal breeding season is from November through March. The key to raising a healthy iguana in captivity is mimicking as closely as possible the diet and environment they would have if they were wild.  It is highly important that their diet contain no animal protein.  These lizards are folivores, and thrive on variety.  Therefore, offering...

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Geckos

Geckos

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Oct 8, 2014

Geckos are a very interesting and ornate group of reptiles.Leopard geckos are among the largest, at 8-9 inches, and differ from the rest in many ways.  They have a prominent outer ear, eyelids, and do not have lamellae, the suction cup-like ends to their toes for which most geckos are so famous.  Juvenile leopard geckos have a striped pattern that changes to spots with maturity.  They are usually yellow with brown markings, but there are many beautiful variations of this pattern available today. When purchasing a gecko, look for signs of good health and sanitary housing.  Only captive-bred animals should be purchased.  You should ask to see the gecko eat.  Healthy geckos will usually have good appetites.  Wild geckos that have traveled all the way from their homelands of Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, or India will be stressed and undoubtedly have a high parasitic load. Geckos should be housed in a long aquarium, as opposed to a high one, since they are terrestrial.  A 20-gallon tank is large enough for 3-4 adult geckos, but only one of these should be a male, or they will fight each other.  The best substrates to use are newspaper, Astroturf, or paper towels.  While attractive, sand and other granular or chipped substrates may cause impaction.  Rocks and logs provide decorative exercise areas.  One hide box should be provided per gecko.  The areas under the hide boxes should be kept moist.  This will mimic the cool burrows they dig in the wild to escape their very arid surroundings, and will also aid in shedding. Leopard geckos are nocturnal, but some ultraviolet lighting is necessary for...

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Chameleons

Chameleons

Posted by Chadwell Animal Hospital on Oct 8, 2014

Chameleons are unique and intriguing lizards.  While not low maintenance reptiles by any means, a small amount of research will prove the difference between a good care provider and an unsuccessful one. A variety of chameleon species are available for purchase.  Veiled chameleons have large casques on their heads.  Jackson’s  chameleons are even more unique; the males have three “horns” protruding laterally from their heads.  Panther chameleons sport no unique appendages, but do possess the vibrant colors, prehensile tail, and curious, mitten-like feet, which are all hallmarks of this interesting group of reptiles. Before purchasing one of these endearing creatures, the buyer should be aware of many potential problems.  Only captive-bred animals should be considered.  Wild caught chameleons tend to be dehydrated and have a heavy parasitic load.  Inadequate calcium levels due to improper lighting and/or diet result in metabolic bone disease.  Chameleons with this ailment may have a bowlegged stance, a curved back or swollen jaw, difficulty walking or climbing, and may even drag their rear limbs.  Sunken eyes may indicate dehydration, while closed eyes during daylight are unusual, and may indicate general ill health.  Dark, drab colors are a red flag for stress, illness, or an environment that is too cold.  Cheesy material or a green color in the oral cavity means “mouth rot”, a serious bacterial infection.  In general, chameleons do not like to be handled.  If gentle restraint does not elicit a gaping mouth and hissing, the lizard is most likely unhealthy. In making a purchase, adult animals should be overlooked, since chameleons are not known for their longevity.  Even if a prospective chameleon appears...

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